Could this be Western Europe’s oldest false tooth?

Archaeologists have discovered what could be remains of the earliest false tooth found in Western Europe. The 2,300-year-old dental implant was found in Le Chene, northern France, in the chamber of a young Iron Age woman who died in her twenties.

Headlines-new-resized_21-fedd12a


Archaeologists have discovered what could be remains of the earliest false tooth found in Western Europe. The 2,300-year-old dental implant was found in Le Chene, northern France, in the chamber of a young Iron Age woman who died in her twenties. Dating back to the third century BC, the implant – an iron pin found in place of an upper incisor tooth – may have once held a wood or bone false tooth, BBC News reports. Discovered while housing development work was taking place in the area, the chamber was one of four found belonging to adult females in an enclosure in the Champagne-Ardenne region.

Advertisement

To read the BBC News article in full, click here.

 

Recreating D-Day

French researchers have scanned and recreated D-Day landing crafts, gliders and an artificial harbour to bring visitors a virtual experience of the invasion of Normandy, the Daily Mail reports. Created by Paris firm Dassault Systèmes, the team spent almost eight months putting together the reconstructions, which are designed to “safeguard the memory of some of the remarkable engineering achievements of D-Day”. The accurate, scientific reconstructions can be seen online or when viewed through virtual reality goggles, and will feature in an upcoming documentary, D-Day’s Sunken Secrets.

To read the Daily Mail article in full, click here.
 

Angkor still has secrets to reveal

Australian and Cambodian archaeology teams have used Nasa technology to reveal more than 200 hidden paintings on the walls of Cambodia’s Temple of Angkor Wat, the world’s largest religious monument, Live Science reports. Mixed in among floral patterns and images of animals, the faded pictures, which are invisible to the naked eye, are thought to be ancient graffiti, made by pilgrims visiting the holy site after it was abandoned in the 15th century.

To read the Live Science article in full, click here.

 

First World War training site found at Camp Dodge

A series of trenches that were used by First World War troops during training have been discovered at Camp Dodge near Johnston, Iowa, The Des Moines Register reports. Unearthed using high tech radar mapping technology, the complex of trench systems was found to contain ammunition casings, a practice hand grenade and barbed wire.

To read The Des Moines Register article in full, click here.

Civil rights activist Maya Angelou dies

Author Maya Angelou has died at the age of 86. Famed for her memoir I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, which recalls her childhood of oppression and abuse in the Deep South in the 1930s, Angelou died on Wednesday in her home in Winston-Salem, North Carolina.

To read the Sky News article in full, click here.

Advertisement

Written by Connie Milton